Mathematics: Unit Three Reflection – Criterion B Assessment

Approaching unfamiliar situations and finding patterns is an important skill to have and is an effective problem solving strategy. Having this skill in one's math toolkit is useful. Criterion B especially focuses on investigating patterns and explaining why they behave the way they do, which was exemplified in the recent Criterion B Assessment. I think I did well this assessment. Unlike last time, I kept a controlled variable and tried to notice patterns with the dependent variables. By changing the controlled variable (to be specific, the number of edge points) it was possible…Read more …

Mathematics: Unit Two Reflection “Rational Numbers”

The second unit of the year has come to an end. This one has been about rational numbers; the knowledge that I've learnt during this unit can be applied to many real world situations. Since we use rational numbers all the time in real life, it is essential to know the skills to use them correctly. I think I am best at using the order of operations to solve multi-step problems involving different operations. Without the order of operations, one could solve an arithmetic problem in different ways; knowing the order of operations…Read more …

Mathematics: Unit One Reflection “Problem Solving Assessment”

First of all, I'd like to say that the assessment was very well put together and I had a great time working through the problems. I did fairly well in most of the areas especially in the first three problems about the three swimmers and the patterns in their plans. I found it fairly easy to recognise the patterns and create functions to match those patterns, and it was second nature for the most part. I analysed the data and made sure to check my answers. My answers also included appropriate mathematical vocabulary.…Read more …

Strange, Huh?

We need to learn all of these... And yet we shouldn't... I was actually very interested in that 'teacher only conference' about mathematics.Read more …

Properties of 2D and 3D Shapes

Here is my math menu activity for 2D and 3D shapes. It is an auditory learner activity. It's a lot easier to see the words if you watch in full screen with 1080p turned on, so if it is not possible to 'full-screen-ize' the video, click the little Youtube icon to watch the video on Youtube. That way, you can turn full screen mode on.Read more …

Finding the Area and Perimeter of Compound Shapes

Finding the area and perimeter of these shapes aren't hard. Watch and learn! Area: To find the area of this figure, we need to add up the areas of all the shapes. First, let's find the area of the yellow square. This is found by multiplying the side length by itself, or squaring. 4.8cm x 4.8cm = 23.04cm² Since there are two squares of the same kind, we multiply the result by two. 23.04cm² x 2 = 46.08cm² Now, it is time to find the area of the circles. First, let us find the…Read more …

6 / 2(1 + 2) = ?

Take a look at the math expression above. Take a moment and try to solve it. What is the answer? Let me make my arguments on why the answer could be 1 OR 9. If this was a simple expression like a / b x c, you would go from left to right to solve it (According to PEMDAS, multiplication has the exact same "rank" as division. So we would go from left to right.) If you interpret the above expression as 6 / 2 x (1+2), the answer would be 9. Below…Read more …

Determining the No. of Solutions To a Quadratic Equation

The result of the discriminant, aka. b² - 4ac, determines the number of solutions that a quadratic equation has. Before I explain, let me tell you the different scenarios. 1. The discriminant evaluates to a positive number. This means that there are TWO solutions to the quadratic equation. 2. The discriminant evaluates to 0. This means that there is only ONE solution to the quadratic equation. 3. The discriminant evaluates to a negative number. This means that there is NO REAL solution to the quadratic equation (no imaginary or complex numbers just yet...).…Read more …

Teachers, Oh Teachers

(5 years ago, no knowledge on negative numbers) "Teacher, what's 8 - 13?" "No, that's not possible. You cannot take 13 from 8. 13 is larger than 8.You can take 8 from 13 though. If you were to do so, you would get 5." (present, no knowledge on imaginary and complex numbers) "Teacher, what's 8 - 13?" "Well, if you take 8 from 13, that would be 5, and the negative version of that is -5!" "Teacher, two more questions. Are all numbers real?" "Of course! All numbers are real! What do you…Read more …

Game of 31

Here's another math problem, as usual, we did this one in class. Search this problem up in Google if you want to follow along, as I cannot find a rule sheet for this game. Assuming all numbers from 1-6 are available, our target number(s) are 24, 17, 11, and 3. I know that because there are 6 types of cards, and no matter what the opponent chooses, you will win. For example, if I am at 24, and it is my opponent's turn, he can choose any card (such as 5), and I…Read more …