1. How did you become more aware of your own strengths and areas for growth? Even though I already taught children in two different countries, when I attended Kids4Kids reading sessions I thought that these were much different then what I experienced in my CAS trips. This is because the kids in the Kids4Kids sessions were more unruly than the children I taught in Myanmar or Bali. As a result, I learned more about my skills in handling and teaching small children. I learned how to build the relationship between me and the child I was assigned to, so that I could better hold his/her attention. I learned how to be more patient with the children when they were not listening to me, or not wanting to follow the programme that the session leaders are carrying out. Screen Shot 2017-05-10 at 8.46.59 am
  2.  How did you undertake challenges that developed new skills? In 2016, I took a crash course in First Aid from the Hong Kong Red Cross that took up my entire weekend from 9am to 6pm. This course challenged me because I had to learn and retain knowledge on how to manage bleeding, manage fractures, how to perform CPR and other written knowledge from all 30 hours or 3-4 weekends of the course. In the end, this experience paid out and I was imbued with new knowledge on how to carry out First Aid, which can be seen by my First Aid certificate. Displaying IMG_1320.JPG
  3.  How did you discuss, evaluate and plan student-initiated activities? In 2016, I pulled upon my past experiences teaching kids, to help me productively work with the 3 other members of my group in my Northwest Bali CAS trip to teach local children how to speak or read English. As a result of my past experience of teaching children in Myanmar, I was able to provide useful advice to my group members on how to handle the children. I recognised that the teaching conditions of both CAS trips were different, and as a result gladly accepted the ideas of my peers. 
  4. How did you persevere in action? In 2016, I was one of the people operating the Reading Tree game booth at the school’s Mid-Autumn festival. The task of preparing the equipment for the booth was tedious and extremely hard, because we had to keep replacing the tools needed for the game booth since they broke easily. When our shift at the booth was almost over, we realised that that we were quickly running out of prizes. So we had to improvise and conserve the prizes so that there were enough prizes for the second shift to give out.
  5.  How did you work collaboratively with others? I worked with other members of Reading Tree to develop ideas on how to spread awareness of the club, and what ideas we should do to promote the club’s goals. Such ideas included how to better market the club through the creation of a “tree” in the library to promote the club, the skit promoting the club at InGINuity and how to alter the club facebook page to attract more people to view the page.
  6. How did you develop international-mindedness through global engagement, multilingualism and intercultural understanding? In 2015, I worked individually to come up with new ideas and methods, in order to effectively teach local children in Myanmar english whose command of English was rudimentary at best. They also taught me a bit about their own culture while I was teaching them english. In 2016, I was given the opportunity to volunteer in a Roots & Shoots event where the esteemed and renowned Doctor Jane Goodall came to give a talk at our school. I volunteered as a usher for the visiting students and faculty from other schools, and this broadened my understanding of how global warming and pollution is affecting the environment. Displaying IMG_0841.JPG
  7. How did you consider the ethical implications of your actions? In Grade 8 and 9, I attended beach clean-ups to help broaden my understanding of how pollution is affecting the environment. These beach clean-ups broadened my understanding of where my waste could or does end up once I dispose of it, and this urged me to try and recycle more of my waste.

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